Ecology


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Coal Train Comin’

Rex Weyler

Canada’s dangerous bargain with US lignite, the world’s dirtiest coal: This summer, Port Metro Vancouver approved a coal export terminal on the Fraser River, despite severe warnings by health officials and ecologists. Over the last decade, Canadian federal conservatives and BC Liberals have gutted the industrial review process, silenced scientists, eroded ecological protections, and attempted […]

The Last Stand

David Ellingsen

BIO David Ellingsen is a photographer and environmental artist, who creates images of site-specific installations, landscapes and object studies. The Last Stand images speak to humanity’s impact on the natural world, and are motivated by the challenges of sustainability within contemporary Western culture. Since 2001, David has exhibited his work in  commercial and public galleries in […]

Tongue of the Sea

Judy Williams

The Gitga’at Nation residents of Hartley Bay, BC, spent June 20, 2014 stringing a 20,000 foot crocheted “Chain of Hope” across the 11,544 foot entrance to Douglas Channel from Hawkesbury Island to their home village. The Chain of Hope marks the proposed exit route for tankers carrying Alberta tar sands bitumen from Kitimat to Asia. […]

Saving the Songs of Innocence

John Dixon

From time to time, Salmonberry Arts will introduce a guest artist. The following short story was written by John Dixon, who has lived in and cruised the Desolation Sound area for many years. SAVING THE SONGS OF INNOCENCE by John Dixon  When I was a little boy, we called them Blackfish. My father and I […]

Lake with a Thousand Faces

Rex Weyler

I live on a lake with a thousand faces. Its personality changes not only day-to-day, but moment to moment, one minute menacing and dark, then ethereal with silver light dancing everywhere, and then solemn again, like glass, then lively with trout feeding at the surface. Hague Lake, near the centre of southern Cortes Island, is […]

Fukushima, & Runaway Trains

Rex Weyler

by Rex Weyler Over 2500 years ago, Chinese Taoist Lao Tzu included precaution among his attributes of wisdom in the Tao Te Ching: “Those who rush ahead don’t go far,” he warned. “Better safe than sorry,” my mother warned me many times. Most mothers have said something similar: “Safety first” or “look before you leap.” […]

Salmonberries

Norm Gibbons

 Salmonberry by Norm Gibbons  Consider the name. Does it not sound like a celebration? On Cortes Island we often curse the more aggressive native plants.  Horsetail, salal, ferns, brambles, and exotics, like couch grass and broom, give us nightmares. They invade gardens, grow over trails and force us to concede that nature remains in charge. […]